Weldable Materials

We have extensive information on the weldability of materials ranging from common metals to exotic alloys. Much of this data is based on our years of experience working with and welding these materials using both electron beams and lasers. Difficult to weld and dissimilar materials are covered.

Aluminum

melting point

1220°F / 660°C

Aluminum is very light, very strong, extremely flexible and corrosion resistant because its surface is always covered in an extremely thin and yet very strong layer of oxide film. It’s a great electrical and heat conductor and forms alloys with practically all other metals. It is usually weldable, but porosity can be an issue, as well as cracking.

Electron Beam
Welding
Continuous Wave
Laser Welding
Pulsed Laser
Welding
6061 to 4047: Weldable
2219 to 2219: Weldable
1100 to 2219: Weldable
6061 to 6061: Weldable (Only with Filler)
5000 Series: Marginal weld

Beryllium Copper

melting point

1587-1750°F / 865-955°C

Beryllium copper is a copper alloy with 0.5—3% beryllium and sometimes other elements. Beryllium copper combines high strength with non-magnetic and non-sparking qualities. It has excellent metalworking, forming and machining properties.

Electron Beam
Welding
Continuous Wave
Laser Welding
Pulsed Laser
Welding
Welds well, needs deoxidizing

Chromoly Steel

melting point

2610°F / 1432°C

Chromoly steel is alloy of steel, chromium and molybdenum, which increase the strength and corrosion resistance of the material. It has good formability, machinability, and weldable. Preheat is often necessary and is almost always recommended.

Electron Beam
Welding
Continuous Wave
Laser Welding
Pulsed Laser
Welding
4140 Weldable. May need Preheat.

Copper

melting point

1983°F / 1084°C

Copper is a soft, malleable, and ductile metal with very high thermal and electrical conductivity. It has a very attractive appearance. It welds fair, but porosity and cracking may be a problem. We recommend working with OFHC.

Electron Beam
Welding
Continuous Wave
Laser Welding
Pulsed Laser
Welding
Copper

Hastelloy

melting point

2410-2460°F / 1320-1350°C

Hastelloy is a steel, nickel, molybdenum and chromium alloy that has extremely high corrosion resistance. It’s extremely tough, is formable and weldable.

Electron Beam
Welding
Continuous Wave
Laser Welding
Pulsed Laser
Welding
Weldable

Inconel

melting point

2540-2600°F / 1390-1425°C

Inconel is a family of austenitic nickel-chromium-based superalloys. Inconel alloys are oxidation-corrosion-resistant materials well suited for service in extreme environments subjected to pressure and heat.

Electron Beam
Welding
Continuous Wave
Laser Welding
Pulsed Laser
Welding
600: Weldable
625: Weldable
718: Weldable
750: Weldable

Iron

melting point

2060-2200°F / 1127 - 1204°C

Iron is a very common metal with fair strength and low corrosion resistance. It is malleable and is weldable but porosity may be a problem. It generally requires preheating.

Electron Beam
Welding
Continuous Wave
Laser Welding
Pulsed Laser
Welding
Iron

Kovar

melting point

2640°F / 1449°C

Kovar is a low expansion alloy of iron, nickel and cobalt. Commonly used for hermetic sealing, it welds well if not plated. Nickel plating causes cracks.

Electron Beam
Welding
Continuous Wave
Laser Welding
Pulsed Laser
Welding
Kovar

Magnesium Alloys

melting point

660-1200°F / 349-649°C

Magnesium alloys are mixtures of magnesium with other metals usually aluminum, manganese and zinc. It is stiff, hard, and very light. It burns and is very porous. It welds with special techniques, and needs to be welded in a vacuum chamber.

Electron Beam
Welding
Continuous Wave
Laser Welding
Pulsed Laser
Welding
Magnesio=um Alloys

Molybdenum

melting point

4750°F / 2620°C

Molybdenum is a silvery-white metal that is ductile and highly resistant to corrosion. It has one of the highest melting points of all pure elements — only the elements tantalum and tungsten have higher melting points. Somewhat difficult to weld, it requires special techniques including preheating. Resultant welds tend to be brittle.

Electron Beam
Welding
Continuous Wave
Laser Welding
Pulsed Laser
Welding
Molybdenum

Monel

melting point

2372-2462°F / 1300-1350 °C°C

Monel is a family of alloys, composed of nickel (52% – 67%) and copper, with small amounts of iron, manganese, carbon, and silicon. Monel is stronger than pure nickel, and are especially corrosion resistant. Monel is is typically hard to machine and is weldable.

Electron Beam
Welding
Continuous Wave
Laser Welding
Pulsed Laser
Welding
Monel

Nickel

melting point

2647°F / 1453°C

Nickel is a silvery white, ferromagnetic metal that is ductile, fairly corrosion resistant and harder than iron.

Electron Beam
Welding
Continuous Wave
Laser Welding
Pulsed Laser
Welding
Nickel

Precipitation Hardening (PH) Stainless Steels

melting point

2560-2625°F / 1404-1440°C

Precipitation hardening stainless steels contain chromium and nickel and combine high strength when heat treated and high corrosion resistance.

Electron Beam
Welding
Continuous Wave
Laser Welding
Pulsed Laser
Welding
17-4 Weldable
13-8 Weldable
15-5 Weldable

Stainless Steel

melting point

2750°F / 1510°C

Stainless steel is a steel alloy with a minimum of 10.5% chromium content and a maximum of 1.2% carbon by mass. It is very corrosion resistant. There are many series of stainless steel, some of which are weldable, others of which are very difficult to weld.

Electron Beam
Welding
Continuous Wave
Laser Welding
Pulsed Laser
Welding
304: Weldable
304L: Weldable
316: Weldable
316L: Weldable
410: Weldable
420: Weldable
430: Weldable
440A: Weldable

Steel-High Carbon

melting point

2600-2803°F / 1425-1543°C

Approximately .60% – 1.00% carbon content, this material is very strong, used for springs, edged tools, and high-strength wires. Over .50% carbon content is weldable with special techniques, may require stress relief.

Electron Beam
Welding
Continuous Wave
Laser Welding
Pulsed Laser
Welding
Over .50% of carbon

Steel-Low Carbon

melting point

2600-2800°F / 1425-1540°C

Also called Mild steel, .05% – .20% of its weight is comprised of carbon. It has a relatively low tensile strength but it easy for form and inexpensive. It Electron Beam welds well except for free machining grades.

Electron Beam
Welding
Continuous Wave
Laser Welding
Pulsed Laser
Welding
.10% - .20% of carbon

Steel-Medium Carbon

melting point

2600-2801°F / 1425-1541°C

Approximately 0.305 –.60% carbon content, it strikes a balance between ductility and strength and has good wear resistance. Used commonly in automative applications and for for large parts. Anything over .20% carbon may require preheat and post heat.

Electron Beam
Welding
Continuous Wave
Laser Welding
Pulsed Laser
Welding
20% - .50% of carbon

Tantalum

melting point

5400°F / 2980°C

Tantalum is dark, dense, ductile, very hard, easily fabricated, and highly conductive of heat and electricity. It is highly corrosion resistant and has an extremely high melting point temperature.

Electron Beam
Welding
Continuous Wave
Laser Welding
Pulsed Laser
Welding
Tantalum

Titanium

melting point

3040°F / 1670°C

Titanium has high corrosion resistance and the highest strength-to-density ratio of any metal. It can be alloyed with other metals such as iron, aluminium, vanadium, and molybdenum to create strong, lightweight materials for many applications.

Electron Beam
Welding
Continuous Wave
Laser Welding
Pulsed Laser
Welding
Grade 2
Grade 5
Grade 9

Tungsten

melting point

6150°F / 3400°C

Tungsten is a hard, dense, robust, rare metal. It has the highest highest melting point of all the elements. It tends to be brittle. Tungsten’s hardness and high density lend it to military applications.

Electron Beam
Welding
Continuous Wave
Laser Welding
Pulsed Laser
Welding
Tungsten

Our staff is here to solve problems

Use the form below or call us at 1 (631) 293-8565.